The 6 steps to achieving a good work/life balance

Having a good work-life balance is important for you, your close friends and your family. A work-life balance is being able to dedicate sufficient time to these two aspects of your life without one taking over the other one to the point that you are neglecting it. It might be about not taking work home and also about not having to worry about problems at work during the time you should be focusing on getting something done. It is about boundaries, about prioritising and about being present both at work and at home. Managing this correctly is the key to less stress and a better mood.

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Bronwyn SouthrenComment
4 ways to support your employees mental well-being

Many employees can feel as if they will be judged or discriminated against if they open up about a mental health condition. This can stop them from getting help when they need it the most. For this reason it is important to fight the stigma regarding mental health in the workplace. One in three employees has suffered or is currently suffering from diagnosed mental health condition, yet most of them are unwilling to speak openly about what they are going through. They may don’t want their employer to look at them as weak and as if they aren’t capable to do their job properly. By being open and supportive about mental health in organisations - less people will be worried to come forward and ask for the support they may need.

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Sam GlassComment
You can't have PTSD, you're not in the military

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can develop after you experience a traumatic event. Some people assume that if you have PTSD, it’s because you were once in the military. This is far from what actually happens. While there is a clear link between PTSD and being a way veteran, but people can experience traumatic events outside of the battlefield as well. The key is having experienced a traumatic event, not being in the military. PTSD can affect 1 in 3 of those affected by a traumatic event. These can be defined as events that make the person that experiences them feel very threatened or at risk. The threat or risk can be to themselves or to others, witnessing a traumatic event can be enough to cause PTSD. Examples include road accidents, sexual or domestic abuse, violent attacks, witnessing violence, military combat, being held hostage, terrorist attacks and natural disasters such as tornadoes. Given that 60% of men and 50% of women in the USA experience a traumatic event in their lifetime and that 1 in 3 people who experience trauma develop PTSD, it is more common than we think.

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Sam GlassComment
'I can get over my depression on my own, I don't need help!'

Given that 1 in 4 people will suffer from a mental health condition at some point in their lives, we most likely all know somebody who will experience anxiety and/or depression. We may even be that quarter of the population. When depression and anxiety hit, it can hit hard. Given this, those suffering may not feel as if they want nor need medical intervention or any form of intervention at all. How can one eat healthy, exercise, think positively or do anything else that is recommended for somebody with depression - when they can barely find the strength to get out of bed or do simple everyday things like brush their hair or change their clothes. Not only this, anxious thoughts can result in complete denial of what is really going on. “I’m not depressed, that would make me mentally ill and I’m fine.”

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Sam GlassComment